You asked: Who called biodiversity hotspot?

Why is it called biodiversity hotspots?

Forests are called biodiversity hot spots

As forest is nature mate and is the home for many diversified form of animals as well as vascular plants that are located found there only as it is not threatened by human habitation.

Who popularized biodiversity in India?

Identify the level of biodiversity represented by 50000 strains of rice in India. Edward Wilson was the Socio-biologist who popularised the term ‘Biodiversity’ . He even described different levels of Biodiversity . There are more than 50,000 strains or rice in India which is an example of Genetic Diversity .

Where is biodiversity hotspot in India?

Officially, four out of the 36 Biodiversity Hotspots in the world are present in India: the Himalayas, the Western Ghats, the Indo-Burma region and the Sundaland. To these may be added the Sundarbans and the Terrai-Duar Savannah grasslands for their unique foliage and animal species.

WHO declares mega diverse countries?

The World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC) of the United Nations Environment Program has identified a total of 17 mega-diverse countries: Australia, Brazil, China, Colombia, Ecuador, United States, Philippines, India, Indonesia, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mexico, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Democratic Republic of Congo, …

How many hotspots are there in India name them?

It hosts four biodiversity hotspots: the Himalayas, the Western Ghats, the Indo-Burma region and Sundaland (including the Nicobar Islands). These hotspots have numerous endemic species.

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Who first coined the term hotspots with reference to biodiversity when?

How did the concept of biodiversity hotspots begin? In 1988, British ecologist Norman Myers published a seminal paper identifying 10 tropical forest “hotspots.” These regions were characterized both by exceptional levels of plant endemism and serious levels of habitat loss.

What is biodiversity hotspot example?

Biodiversity hotspots are regions that are both biologically fertile (rich distribution of plants and animals) and highly threatened. … Examples of biodiversity hotspots are forest habitats as they constantly face destruction and degradation due to illegal logging, pollution and deforestation.